Rich Country Climate Plans Threaten Economies in Developing Countries
A new report – Restricting Growth: The Impact of Industrialized Country Climate Strategies on the World’s Poor – reveals how proposals on land use and forestry advanced by industrialized countries will reduce economic growth in developing countries and while failing to reduce emissions. The report was released by World Growth, on the sidelines of the UNFCCC annual meeting in Durban.

Show Me The Money
While economies around the world take stock in the wake f a crippling recession, financing research into climate change has become a dueling ground. Lisa Palmer, a freelance journalist based near Washington DC looks at recent climate change science spending in the United States and the United Kingdom, and the trends in foundation grants and science collaborations with developing countries.

The curious case of the expanding environmental group with falling income
When Douglas Alexander travelled to New Delhi last September to announce Britain was presenting £10 million to the Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), standing alongside him was an imposing, bearded figure, writes Christopher Booker and Richard North in Telegraph.

Collectivism, Climate Change, and Economic Freedom
It would probably turn out that if the necessary adjustments were allowed to be made, global warming, if it actually came, would prove highly beneficial to mankind on net balance, writes George Reisman.

Global Wealth Can Heal the Planet
Free-market nations are better at protecting their environments than statist regimes.By Jonah Goldberg

Carbon Trading On A Crash Course
The price of carbon under the Certified Emission Reduction scheme governed by the Clean Development Mechanism, has declined today to less than a fourth from the high of Euro 30 per tonne in 2008. China and India together constitute 75% of the global carbon market. With the UNFCCC meeting in Durbannot expected to yield any legally binding agreement, and the Koyto Protocol set to expire in 2012, the carbon market is expected to face even greater uncertainty, writes Hardev Sanotra.

Durban due diligence on climate change
We must demand scientific rigour on climate change, or we will reap the consequences, writes Kevin Kemm

Decarbonisation of The Economy
Decarbonisation of the world economy is a natural process which evolves due to the human need to lower the cost of energy –which has made heat -to-energy processes more energy efficient and has been going on for the past 500 years. A competitive market continuously strives for greater energy efficiency. Mr. Barun Mitra shows how the Indian economy has been following the same path towards decarbonisation after the initiative of economic liberalisation in the early 1990s. Developing countries like India, in his view, must have the freedom to choose the lowest-cost and most efficient energy solutions in order to pursue their economic development.
Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature Project released the findings of its study on global land temperatures over the past century. Physics professor Richard Muller, who led the study, presents the findings in The Wall Street Journal in an op-ed titled “The Case Against Global-Warming Skepticism.” Prof. Singer, director of the Science & Environmental Policy Project is skeptical about the IPCC, and the Berkeley findings, as these studies suffer from common errors such as temperature records being affected by the urban heat-island effect. Therefore, he suggests additional tests.

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